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Broccoli nutrition —fact and health benefits

 

Broccoli nutrition —fact and health benefit

broccoli nutrition

Broccoli belongs in a healthy, plant-based diet, but preparing it a certain way (steamed beats boiled – big time) can give it an even bigger health boost. Here’s everything you need to know about “America’s favorite vegetable,” including health advantages, cooking techniques, and storage advice.

Broccoli Nutritional Information Serving Size: 1 cup chopped broccoli

calories: 30
0 g fat total
Carbohydrate: 6 g
fiber 2 g
2.5 grams of protein
Vitamin C (81 mg) (90 percent DV)
93 micrograms of vitamin K (78 percent DV)
Vitamin A 567 IU (64 percent DV)
57 micrograms of folate (14 percent DV)
Potassium: 288 mg (6 percent DV)
Magnesium 19 mg (5 percent DV)
Phosphorus (60 mg) (5 percent DV)
Iron: 0.66 mg (4 percent DV)
Calcium (43 mg) (3 percent DV)
Zinc 0.37 mg (3 percent DV)
Broccoli’s health benefits include:
Brassica vegetables (such as broccoli) offer a wealth of health-promoting substances and potentially strong phytochemicals. These nutrients may be used to:
Inflammation-reduction: “Broccoli includes the chemical glucoraphanin, which is transformed to sulforaphane during digestion. Antioxidant activity is induced by sulforaphane “The International Food Information Council’s Manager of Nutrition Communications, Alyssa Pike, R.D., agrees. Sulforaphane and other phytochemicals can assist the body combat free radicals and inflammation.
Immune support: Did you know that broccoli has more vitamin C than an orange in a cup? Vitamin C is an antioxidant that helps the immune system operate properly (not to mention helping reduce risk of several chronic diseases). Broccoli also contains a number of additional vitamins and minerals that have been linked to good health.
Reduce the risk of some cancers: People who consume more fruits and vegetables have a lower risk of a variety of cancers. Diets high in cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, may lower cancer risk in a variety of tissues, including the lungs, bladder, and prostate.
“Broccoli includes lutein and zeaxanthin, which are both antioxidants that can help avoid oxidative stress and contribute to eye health,” Pike notes.
Improve blood sugar management: Broccoli includes sulforaphane, a natural plant chemical that has been shown to help patients with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar levels. Broccoli also contains fiber and is naturally low in carbohydrates, making it a low-glycemic food. Riced broccoli is a low-carb alternative to rice.
Support a healthy heart: Broccoli is high in folate, potassium, and iron, all of which are essential for heart health. Participants who ate more cruciferous veggies like broccoli had less calcium deposition in their aortas than those who ate less of these veggies, according to a study published in The British Journal of Nutrition.
Prior studies indicated that sulforaphane reduced skin redness and inflammation induced by UV radiation, in addition to being a great source of vitamin C, which supports collagen formation and skin health.
Prior studies indicated that sulforaphane reduced skin redness and inflammation induced by UV radiation, in addition to being a great source of vitamin C, which supports collagen formation and skin health.

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