Biography & net worth

Ray Charles Net Worth

Ray Charles Net Worth

Ray Charles Net Worth: What was Ray Charles net worth when he died?

Ray Charles Net Worth

Ray Charles was a singer, recording and philanthropist. He is one of the most revered musicians of the 20th century. He had an estimated net worth of $75 million at the time of his death.

 

Ray was born on September 23, 1930, in Albany, Georgia. He started to show interest in music at the tender age of 3 at the Pitman’s Red Wing Cafe where he’d watch Pitman play an old upright piano.It was in 1953 that he scored his first big hit single after signing with Atlantic Records. Mess Around was not only popular in its day, but remains one of Charles’ most popular songs.

Ray headlined the White House Correspondents Dinner in Washington DC in 2003. His final public appearance was on April 30, 2004, at the dedication of his music studio as a landmark in Los Angeles.

 

What was Ray Charles net worth when he died?

Ray died at his home in Beverly Hills, California as a result of liver failure on June 10, 2004, at the age of 73. He had an estimated net worth of $75 million. He earned this through his career as a musician, artist, actor, music artist and many others.Ray Charles was a pioneer of soul music, integrating R&B, gospel, pop and country to create hits like “Unchain My Heart,” “Hit the Road Jack” and “Georgia on My Mind.”

Who Was Ray Charles?

Ray Charles was a legendary musician who pioneered the genre of soul music during the 1950s. Often called the “Father of Soul,” Charles combined blues, gospel and jazz to create groundbreaking hits such as “Unchain My Heart,” “Hit the Road Jack” and “Georgia on My Mind.” He died in 2004, leaving a lasting impression on contemporary music.

 

Early Life

Ray Charles Robinson was born on September 23, 1930, in Albany, Georgia. His father, a mechanic, and his mother, a sharecropper, moved the family to Greenville, Florida when he was an infant. One of the most traumatic events of his childhood was witnessing the drowning death of his younger brother.

 

Soon after his brother’s death, Charles gradually began to lose his sight. He was blind by the age of 7, and his mother sent him to a state-sponsored school, the Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind in St. Augustine, Florida — where he learned to read, write and arrange music in Braille. He also learned to play piano, organ, sax, clarinet and trumpet. The breadth of his musical interests ranged widely, from gospel to country, to blues.

Musical Evolution

Charles’ mother died when he was 15, and for a year he toured on the “Chitlin’ Circuit” in the South. While on the road, he picked up a love for heroin.

 

At the of age 16, Charles moved to Seattle. There, he met a young Quincy Jones, a friend and collaborator he would keep for the rest of his life. Charles performed with the McSon Trio in 1940s. His early playing style closely resembled the work of his two major influences — Charles Brown and Nat King Cole. Charles later developed his distinctive sound.

 

In 1949, he released his first single, “Confession Blues,” with the Maxin Trio. The song did well on the R&B charts. More success on the R&B charts followed with “Baby Let Me Hold Your Hand” and “Kissa Me Baby.” By 1953, Charles landed a deal with Atlantic Records. He celebrated his first R&B hit single with the label, “Mess Around.”

Later Career

Charles avoided jail after his arrest for possession by finally kicking the habit at a clinic in Los Angeles. His releases in the 1960s and ’70s were hit-or-miss, but he remained one of music’s most respected stars. Charles won a Grammy Award for his rendition of Stevie Wonder’s “Living for the City.” Three years later, he released his autobiography Brother Ray.

 

In 1980, Charles appeared in the comedy The Blues Brothers with John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd. The music icon received a special honor a few years later as one of the first people inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Charles was recognized for his contributions to the genre alongside such fellow luminaries as James Brown, Elvis Presley, Sam Cooke and Buddy Holly.

 

Charles returned to the spotlight in the early 1990s with several high-profile appearances. He also recorded commercials for Pepsi-Cola, singing “You Got the Right One, Baby!” as his catchphrase, and performed “We Are the World” for the organization USA for Africa alongside the likes of Billy Joel, Diana Ross, Cyndi Lauper, Bruce Springsteen and Smokey Robinson.

 

Death and Legacy

In 2003, Charles had to cancel his tour for the first time in 53 years. He underwent hip replacement surgery. While that operation was successful, Charles soon learned he was suffering from liver disease. He died on June 10, 2004, at his home in Beverly Hills, California. During his lifetime, Charles recorded more than 60 albums and performed more than 10,000 concerts.

 

Longtime friend Jones was just one of many who mourned the passing of Charles. “There will never be another musician who did as much to break down the perceived walls of musical genres,” Jones stated, according to The New York Times. “Ray used to say that if he had a dime, he would give me a nickel. Well, I would give that nickel back to have him still be here with us, but I know that heaven has become a much better place with him in it.” More than 1,500 people came to say goodbye to the musical legend at his funeral. B.B. King, Willie Nelson and Stevie Wonder were among those who performed at the service.

Movie and Final Album

Charles’s final album, Genius Loves Company, released two months after his death, consists of duets with various admirers and contemporaries. His life story became a hit film entitled Ray later that year. Jamie Foxx starred as the legendary performer, and he won an Academy Award for his portrayal of Charles.

 

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