HealthSTD

Signs You May Have an Iron Deficiency

Signs You May Have an Iron Deficiency

Iron can make the difference between you feeling on top of the world and downright miserable. Check out these surprising signs you need to pump up your iron levels.

Getting enough iron is essential, especially for women. Iron helps you produce red blood cells and maintain a healthy immune system. Watch this video for a list of seven iron-rich foods that can help reduce your risk of an iron deficiency.

You’re exhausted

The most common symptom of iron deficiency, it’s also possibly the most difficult one to detect. “Women are so used to having frenetic lives and feeling tired,” says Nancy Berliner, MD, deputy editor of Blood, the journal of the American Society of Hematology. “They often just dismiss being tired as part of life.” However, iron deficiency causes less oxygen to reach your tissues, so your body is deprived of the energy it needs. If your “normal” fatigue is coupled with you feeling, weak, irritable, or unable to focus, iron (or a lack thereof) might have something to do with it. After all, there’s a reason people whose iron deficiency progresses into anemia are often said to have “tired blood.”

You have heavy periods

In women, the number-one cause of iron deficiency is too-heavy periods, says Jacques Moritz, MD, director of gynecology at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Roosevelt in New York City. “They lose too much blood, replace about half of it, and then lose too much again the following month,” he says. “It’s like filling up a car with a small hold in the tank.” Your period should only fill two to three tablespoons each month. Try the tampon test: If you have to change your tampon more frequently than every two hours, talk to your gyno.

You’re pale

There’s a reason the words “pale” and “sickly” are often used interchangeably. Hemoglobin gives your blood its red color and, thus, your skin its rosy hue. That means that low levels of the protein can suck the color straight from your skin, Dr. Moritz says. If you have a light complexion, it’s pretty easy to spot. No matter your skin tone, though, if the inside of your lips, your gums, and the inside of your bottom eyelids are less red than usual, low iron may be to blame.

You get short of breath easily

No matter how deeply you breathe, if your oxygen levels are low, you’ll feel out of air, explains Dr. Berliner. If you notice yourself getting out of breath doing things that you’d normally handle just fine—be it climbing a flight or stairs or knocking out your usual workout—iron deficiency could be to blame.

Your heart is pounding

An overworked heart can end up suffering from irregular heartbeats, heart murmurs, enlargement, and even heart failure. Before you freak out, don’t. For things to get that bad, you would probably have to suffer from iron deficiency anemia for quite some time, suggests a review of cardiomyopathy and iron deficiency in the Texas Heart Institute Journal. However, if you know you have heart problems, it’s important to get your iron levels checked as iron deficiency can worsen existing heart problems

You have restless leg syndrome

Can’t stop fidgeting? About 15% of people with restless leg syndrome have iron deficiency, according to John Hopkins Medicine. The lower the iron levels, the worse the symptoms

Your head hurts

You crave clay, dirt, and ice

Called pica, craving (and actually eating) non-food substances can be a sign of of iron deficiency. Iron-deficient people may be tempted to chow down on chalk, clay, dirt, and paper. Luckily, most women opt for ice, says Dr. Berliner, who tells her anemic patients to come back to see her if they start craving ice.

You feel anxious for no reason

As if your life wasn’t stressful enough, iron deficiency can trick you into feeling even more anxious. A lack of oxygen revs up your body’s sympathetic nervous system, which is kind of like your body’s gas pedal, Dr. Berliner says. Plus, since iron deficiency can send your heart racing, it’s easy to feel like you’re in fight-or-flight mode even when you have every reason to feel relaxed.

How to get more iron

Iron requirements aren’t one-size-fits-all, especially for women. Women between the ages of 19 and 50 typically need 18 mg per day. However, if you’re pregnant, that amount bumps up to 27 mg. If you’re breastfeeding, you should get just 9 mg. Plus, how heavy your periods are could also alter your needs. Older than 50 and not menstruating? You only need 8 mg per day. That’s not a hard target to hit—a single serving of lentils, spinach, beef, nuts, chicken, or chickpeas, will all score you at least a couple milligrams.

You have celiac or an inflammatory bowel disease

Even if you get enough iron in your diet, celiac disease and inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis can lead to problems absorbing nutrients, iron included. These conditions cause inflammation in and damage to the digestive tract. If you’ve been diagnosed with any of these GI diseases, talk to you doctor about how you can increase your iron absorption.

Your tongue looks weird

Besides sapping the color out of your tongue, low iron counts can reduce levels of myoglobin, a protein in red blood cells that supports muscle health, like the muscle that makes up the tongue, Dr. Berliner says. As a result, many people who are iron deficient complain of a sore, inflamed, and strangely smooth tongue.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top button